Stockton High Street c1895

The commercial sign for the Coffee Palace at 91 High Street, Stockton, included on the left of a general view of the south end of Stockton High Street. Advertisements for Nestles Milk and Liptons Teas on the trailer of a steam tram, included in a general view of the south end of Stockton High Street.

A busy view of the south end of Stockton High Street, including nos. 71,92,97,98 and 106 plus the borough hall. No. 71, Eades, S.S. Piano and organ warehouse. No. 91, Olde Post Office Hotel, No. 97, Victoria Inn. No. 98, J. A. Birkbeck, ironmongers. No. 106 A and G Taylor, photographers. Borough Hall (between No. 91 and 92). Lots of pony traps, horse carts, carriages and cabs plus a tram are included. Several horse cabs waiting by a cab shelter included on the right of a general view of the south end of Stockton High Street on a busy day.

The Borough Hall and its elegant wrought iron entrance canopy (between Nos. 91 and 92) included in a general view of the south end of Stockton High Street. Borough Hall built c1785 as a town house for Mr. R. Dickson, 1852 became Borough offices and a hall was built at the rear. The hall was demolished in 1934 and the offices at the front were removed in c1957 to make way for the new post office (opened 1960). The Shambles on Stockton High Street(built 1825 to replace earlier Shambles).

16 thoughts on “Stockton High Street c1895

  1. I remember a young blonde haired lady called Darley from Mill Street working at the Dodds Chain Library in Norton High Street. In later years she worked for WH Smiths in Stockton. I would think she joined Smiths when the Chain Library closed and was still at Smiths into the new millenium.

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  2. I always called the library in Norton High Street the twopenny library as, if I remember rightly, you payed twopence to borrow a book for a week. Up to leaving school at 16 I lived in there and the lovely lady knowing my tastes for travel and tales of Empire would order books in for me from other shops. She quite often brought books from under the counter she had saved and with a wink would forgo the money. I thank that lady as I thanked Miss English at the Richard Hind although it was years later before it dawned on me they had set me on a path guiding me gently into deeper subjects and the classics. Between them they gave me an insight into art, history, and geography way beyond anything else I learned in school. Years later we got the Stockton Library in the Park off Leven Road then in time that closed and we got the High Street branch. I used them all and still do. It was said a while ago we do not need libraries now in the computer and mass media age, how wrong that is. To children a library still is a wonderland if my own grandchildren are anything to go by. We need them for all the other services they provide plus those wonderful assistants who guide and help all from childhood to second childhood like me. Long may they grow and flourish.

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  3. Dodds also had a lending library in Norton High Street. I believe it was called a ‘chain library.’ It was along the main row of shops and would be opposite, what is now the walkway to the ‘zebra crossing.’

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  4. Alastair and Ken thanks for relieving me of the fear that I might be inflicted with galloping senility. I can only surmise that, apart from such bodies as the miners or engineers institutes, subscription libraries where, then, fairly common throughout Britain. As for the picture I was too young, as I’m sure you gentlemen were, to remember horse and cart traffic or trams on the high street. However before they were tarred over I did see the remains of the tracks veering off Bridge Road into the, then, bus depot on Boathouse Lane.

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  5. I used to borrow books from the Chain Library which I think was next to the Cinema. My favourite author when I was a teenager was Netta Muskett… very risque in those days!!

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  6. Boots circulating library books had, if I remember rightly, a green shield-shaped sticker with the Boots name attached to the front board.

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  7. Mike Renwick. You are not going doolally. Booklending was a significant part of the business from early days. John Boot started the herbalists but the business was greatly expanded by son Jesse. The booklending started in 1898. Dodds in Bishopton Lane also had a lending library. When young I inspected their shelves for books on cricket and also in the Teddy Lester schoolboy series.

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  8. Mike, you are right. The lending library in Boots was on the first floor at the top of the stairs. I seem to remember that the Pharmacy, pharmacist Mr Ramage with assistant Agnes Hall, was also on this floor.

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  9. Memory being somewhat hazy I have to ask does anybody remember a small subscription library located in Boots the chemist, or am I finally going doolally?

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  10. I note with interest the picture on the homepage clearly shows the Chain Library. My aunty was manageress of the library for many years.

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  11. There is now a picture of 103 -106 High Street on this website dated circa 1860. This was at a time when my great great great grandfather was a hairdressser and lived at number 103.

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  12. Anne Doyle: A little more info on A.& G. Taylor, Photographers. The business in Stockton High Street was one of a chain of 70 studios nation-wide in major cities and towns first established by Andrew and George Taylor in London in 1864 who were soon billing themselves as the “The largest photographers in the world” adding outlets in America and Paris. They became photographers to the Queen in 1886.As I mentioned earlier the Stockton studio closed in 1911 which I thought was because Stewarts Clothiers was rebuilt and extended on the site in 1912 but more significantly I think it may have been because of the death of George Taylor in 1911. We may be able to narrow down the period when your photographs were take even more. If they have the Royal Warrant on them obviously it was between 1886 and 1911. If you can describe what is on the reverse we may be able to narrow it down even more.

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  13. Anne Doyle: The photographers you refer to, A&G Taylor are listed as being at 106 High Street, which would be very close to the corner of Ramsgate on the west side of the high street, from 1880 to 1911. Hope that narrows your search a little.

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  14. I have 2 old photos which were taken at the studio of A&G Taylor. They are of some of my ancestors. I”m not sure when they were taken. Is the photographers still there and if not can anyone help to find out who they were or what year it could have been. Thanks in anticipation!

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  15. My town of birth is the same one I am in now, Stockton on Tees. The biggest part of my adult life has been spent away from here and those memories are of no use to anybody but me and the people that were there at that particular time and place. Being away for so long and visiting periodically you tend to notice big chunks missing from your home town whether it is huge areas of housing/shops or fields messed up with new urban clearways ploughing through them. I remember coming home once and shock horror Holm House was still there but someone had built a prison on it and the new Durham Road taking you straight to St Mary’s Church on Norton Road to mention just a couple. That is why all the memories of my childhood and teens are important to get down here and now and if Stockton Pictures will not print certain ones (mind you I will have to think twice about some of them) then I have got my own blog space to enter for prosperity, even memories of this time and place now are intended to be written down in the years to come, not now because they are memoirs to be written down at a later date from your own memories and experiences. My children are in a bigger fix than I am as far as remembering their youth memories and relating them to this area or anyone in this area, daughter borne Darlington, son Nottingham, daughter Germany, son Woolwich and finally my youngest daughter Nottingham and many places in between. The family had just moved to Tidworth in Hampshire, digging the garden with my second son he said when are we moving Dad, this was his fifth house and he wasn’t five yet. ‘Squaddies Kids I think you call them’ Being relatively new to this site and the excitement starting to cool down, (just a little) yes ‘excitement’ because that’s what it is, something to do and something to keep your brain alert. After being discarded from H M Forces after 27 years for getting in the way somewhere along the line then being told “there”s your pension book” at 40 plus “go and put your feet up” does dull the brain a little. Off on a tangent again, my enthusiasm gets the better of me at times ‘sorry‘. I intend now to start a search for all those historical photos that go with my memories and any I can find to go with other folks Blogs. You don’ t need a computer at home to access this site, just go in to any library in the borough and ask to use theirs that are there for public use. You can ask while you are there how to get your pictures to Stockton Pictures, they are there to help and won’t bite. One of my mother’s weekly highlights is going to the library, I don’t know whether she goes to exchange books or just for the chat, she’s in there for ever and I’ve never seen her read a book in years. Roy.

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