31 thoughts on “The village of Hartburn.

  1. I am searching my Mothers family name Noad, they lived in Heartburn Village in the late 19th century and early 20th century, it would be great if you have any information on them.

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  2. Great to read peoples memories of the 6 fields and Sunnyside. My friends and myself spent many hours over there during the summer hols in the 1950s with our airguns, we sometimes walked from the village and occasionally via the brickie. It was good to see Alan Pattison mentioned as I went to junior school with him and his dad used to deliver our milk.

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  3. In 1916 my grandfather lived in Stockton-on-Tees Fieldhouse, Hartburn. Does anybody know where that is and if his house still exsists?

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  4. 6 fields walk still exists as I use it daily walking the dog. A new path / cycleway has been constructed from the West End Bowling Club alongside the brick pond and railway to the tunnel under the A66 but although plans exist to extend it to Preston Park it currently ends at this tunnel with the continuation of the path down the final field and over the railway to Yarm Road still being of the muddy variety. The original path from Quebec Road to the tunnel via the little bridge also still exists, also of the muddy type but as the new one has solar lamps every 10 feet that last til dawn it’s this path that gets the most useage. Personally I far prefer the original but there you go. There were plans so I am told for the environment agency to construct a clay dam to help with flooding and create a wetlands area but I think the money ran dry, pardon the pun. As it stands it is a conservation area that may eventually hold more paved areas ensuring the 6 fields be enjoyed by generations to come as it has been by generations before us.

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  5. The references to the Six Fields are very interesting to me. My family farmed Manor House Farm, Yarm Road which was just down the road from Tatie Hall. The farm site is now occupied by the Stockton Council Refuse department and by a plastic company. Although the farm house was on Yarm Road most of the land was on the other side of the railway and was accessed by a private tunnel under the railway. The boundary between our farm and Red House Farm was the six fields footpath. The path was well used particularly in the summer and the walkers were usually no trouble to us except for odd times when fences were broken down. The path is indeed still there along with the becks. It now goes to Yarm Road via a tunnel under the A66. The adjacent land unfortunately is now derelict which is very sad to someone who’s father used to get his living from it.

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    • Alan Wilkinson – we lived in South Durham Street and my Grandad and Dad were friends of Dick Wilkinson. I remember going shooting and ferreting on Dicks farm with my Grandad, I sometimes used to help with the milking and often turned the butter churn for Dicks wife. I regularly collected cow muck from the farm and barrowed it to my Grandads for his vegatable garden.

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  6. The six fields were a major part of my childhood. A large part of many summers were spent there. We’d walk from Parkfield, over the railway footbridge to Ropner Park and from there to Hartburn. Then most of the day would be spent messing about in the becks and the old orchard. I remember getting a ride from the farmer once on the back of his trainer across the fields. Eventually, we’d make our way across to the railway and would sometimes put pennoes on the track to get them flattened by the train. Fianlly we’d catch the bus back to St Peter’s.

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  7. I am researching the medieval village of West Hartburn for my Archaeology coursework and wondered if anyone knew anything of it – I would be very grateful for any information.

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  8. Potato Hall Farm belonged to my husband Dave’s grandparents. They were George and Ellen Pattison (she was a Tupling before her marriage) and they died in the 40s and are buried in Oxbridge cemetery. The gravestone says ‘late of Potato Hall Farm’ but everyone called it Tatie Hall. The Elstob family who used to farm at Red House Farm, which is still in the same area, behind the Moorhouse Estate just past Peter Barratts, are also relations of the Pattisons. My sister in law has done a family tree if anyone is related. I remember going to Richard Hind with Judith Elstob.

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    • I am also doing my late husbands family tree, his 3x were were Pattisons who were farmers in Sowerby N.York in the 1800s. A family member seems to remember his mother had relatives on a farm in the area you are talking of. Is it possible you could be related to my husband family?

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    • There was a Alan Pattison (Patto) and Snowy Elstob who were from farming families in the Eaglescliffe area, both played football for Preston Sports and Social Club in the sixties.

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      • Probably the same Alan Pattison that played in the Richard Hind football side I was fortunate enough to be part of. It was another team assembled by the excellent Ken Sawyer, he was responsible for putting together so many good sides at the school. There was a photograph of the team I speak of on the old website, not sure if it features on the updated site…

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      • You are probably right about Patto, but you would have been fortunate to play alongside a young Dougie Cattermole in the Richard Hind team and yes Ken Sawyer was the most successful football schoolteacher in the fifties in the Stockton area.

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      • Indeed Dougie Cattermole as well as Alan Pattison were in the team mentioned in my previous comment. Other team players were Brian Summerhill, John McBride, Alan Dodsworth, Geoff Groake, Mick Gilhooley, Tony Elliott, Brian McEwan, Barry Heath and Mick Leighton. Sadly I know of two members of this team have now passed away.

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      • Johnny Pattison was in the RH football team when I started at the school in 1949. He played in the same team as Eddie Wilkinson, Edgar Fellowes, John Morris, Les Tate and other all of whom represented the Town team as well.

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      • Yes John, those two are Mick Gilhooley who was a top Northern League goalkeeper and very good North Yorkshire and South Durham League cricketer for Norton and Mick Leighton who was an original Gashouse Lad from Langley Street.

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  9. Sunnyside was part of the route from Hartburn village to the back road to Eaglescliffe & Yarm. The fields sloped down to the beck and during the snowy winters of the early 1940’s those winter sports slopes were crowded with happy sledgers.
    Somehow the memory is of bright, sunny & crisp days with equally bright & sunny youngsters trying to crowd 4 on to a small wooden sledge but great fun!

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  10. I well remember the “six fields”. Me and my friends would walk up from Parkfield taking with us a “picnic” – probably a bottle of water and a sandwich in a paper bag. We”d start at the Hartburn village end and end up walking back home from Yarm Road. Those were the days when parents didn”t have to be so worried about letting kids out of their sight. There was also a walk which my parents used to take which they referred to as “Sunnyside”. Does anybody know where that was?

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    • Sunnyside was accessed by walking up Harlsey Road you could then walk through the fields and come out on the lane that led to Yarm. Also when you reached the bridge over the beck, if you followed it to the left you came back to the 6 fields.

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  11. Great internet site, I enjoyed seeing the photo”s and reading the comments. I wonder if any of the visitor”s can help me? I notice that a few people mention Potato Hall, which was situated off Yarm Road, past the now demolished Richard Hind School. Would anyone have, or know of a photograph?

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  12. Ged I think u are dead right…I am almost 95% sure it was called Potato Hall. There was a changing room very tatty but who cared as long as I got a game of football. Great times Ged…great times. Barry

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  13. I am not sure that I am on the right track here but was the football field referred to by both Alan and Barry also known as Potato Hall? I remember Richard Hind Senior Football team being allowed to play on a pitch located just off the road to Eaglescliffe. You had to cross the railway lines to reach the field which contained a wooden hut with changing facilities. I remember the football pitch was at the top of the field which sloped down to a beck at the bottom. Happy days so long ago.

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  14. I read your comments on my “Six fields” reference Barry. When I pass the fields driving along the A66 flyover/bye-pass in the direction of Darlington, they look unchanged.I find it hard to pick out the position of the becks etc but would imagine they are still there. They seem still to be natural meadows though I have yet to see any livestock in them. My best man at my first wedding, a good friend called Jack Iceton, played for West End for many years. His brother Alan was a Middlesbrough Junior.

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  15. I MUST RESPOND TO ALLEN WEALLANS AND HIS REFERENCE TO THE “SIX FIELDS WALK” I REMEMBER THE WALK ONLY TOO WELL. IT WAS A GORGEOUS WALK WITH ALL THE FLOWERS AND THE BECKS HOWEVER I REMEMBER IT MORE BECAUSE ONE OF THE FIELDS WAS THE HOME GROUND OF STOCKTON WEST END FOOTBALL CLUB. I USED TO PLAY FOR WEST END OVER A TWO YEAR PERIOD SO MY VISITS TO THE “SIX FIELDS” BECAME QUITE NUMEROUS. I WONDER IF THEY ARE STILL THERE IN ALL THEIR BEAUTY. PLEASE TELL ME

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  16. Richard Hare:- You are right in thinking C. Arthur Head of Hartburn Hall was of the firm “Head Wrightson & Co.” Charles Arthur Head lived at Hartburn Hall from 1879 until his death in Folkstone in 1924 aged 86. In the early 1930″s the property was demolished and Jesmond Grove was built on the site. In all the years I have been interested in Hartburn”s Victorian built properties, I have never managed to trace a photograph of it. However there is a picture of it in an old book in Stockton reference library. Although the picture is captioned it could be of any property. Hope this is of some help. If you want to get in touch my e-mail address is hawthornlodge@ntlworld.com

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  17. Mr Richard Hare. I saw your comments about Hartburn Hall.  Perhaps you mean Hartburn Lodge? There are some good photographs of the Lodge in the book, “Stockton-on-Tees,A Pictorial History” by Robert Woodhouse. It is published by Phillimore & co ltd,Shopwyke Hall,Chichester,Sussex PO20 6BQ. It is crammed full of excellent pictures of Stockton and retailed a few years ago at £9.95. Should you need more info my e mail address is alanandhilary@ah4721.freeserve.co.uk

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  18. Does anyone have a picture of Hartburn Hall? Does it still exist? I”m a bit out of touch, having lived away from the area for 34 yrs, …20 of “em in Canada. Does anyone know if the “C Arthur Head, Hartburn Hall, Stockton-on Tees” (Died probably around 1900) Was of the firm, Head-Wrightson, ..Or am I barking up the wrong tree? Any information, or Pictures would be most appreciated!! With best wishes, Richard Hare.

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  19. Does anyone remember the ” Six fields walk” that went from Yarm Road ( around where the A66 flyover is now) across to Hartburn. My girlfriend and I enjoyed many a Sunday afternoon stroll through the quiet and pleasant greenery, Traversing a couple of tiny becks on route.

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  20. The ancient village of Hartburn, there’s mention of it in The Boldon-Bouke’ 1183, the Bishop of Durhams ‘Domesday-Book’, still has over 400years of history for the visitor to see. On the Photo, far right are a line of housing which incorporate pieces of Stockton Castle stone demolished by Cromwells orders in 1652. On the same side The Masham’Inn , note roof line of a smaller ale-house. In the village :- 1640s Manor-House, with elm tree trunk roof apex beam still in place. ‘Springwell Cottages’ early 1700 of local brick, with small windows and doors. 1700 farms and cottage attractively blend with 1800 structures fronting the post-road to Darlington. A Victorian terrace .with parlours and porches having leaded and stained class windows A busy road for hundreds of years, precluded a village-green , but all the south side cottages have the medieval ‘Croft and Toft’ system ‘Croft’ a long garden fronting the trackway ‘Toft’ a dwelling-place.

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