15 thoughts on “Hartburn Bridge. c1970

  1. Crashed my motorbike here 1972 at the exact spot of the photo and ended up where the car coming towards on the floor. Luckily nothing coming towards at the time. Bent handlebars and footrest. There was diesel on the floor, and possibly at the time a bit of a nutter and going too fast?.
    Dave.

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  2. As a youngster I spent a lot of time trainspotting at Ropner Park/Spring Street bridge, there were a number of us, in the early 1960’s when steam locomotives still appeared.
    A retired railwayman used to cross the bridge occasionally and he would chat to us spotters, he told us the “Cuckoo Line” was so called because the locomotives made the sound of a cuckoo when whistling. I am assuming that he meant the electric locomotives that used this line pre-second world war. That is the only explanation I have ever heard for the name “Cuckoo Line”.

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  3. Cuckoo Line? Great name. Never heard of it. I attended Grangefield Grammar from 1965-1972. In the early years, maybe once every other day, a short, steam-hauled freight train passed by. We used a bridge at the end of the playing fields during cross country runs until the line was lifted. I used to travel under the Hartburn bridge every day on the bus from Sadberge. I always thought the double deckers just made it through. Is the track bed open for walking now? I”d like to walk along it and take a look at Grangefield again. I now live far away, in Japan.

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  4. I was at Grangefield from 1967 and a single, rusty, good condition track was still down all through the late sixties bisecting the schools main and reserve playing fields. I never saw anything use it, until the deep winter of 1969 or 1970. Then to the schools astonishment the familiar shape of an English Electric Type 3 would slowly growl through the cold darkness each morning around 8 am – 8.30am pulling a train from Bowesfield towards Redmarshall. After a while this regular morning working stopped, and a hasty inspection at dinner time indicated the track had gone. Clearly, it was the demolition/track recovery train. Being in lessons I never saw how this train returned or when. The last steam locos I saw using the branch were in the mid – sixties, two coupled, class Q6, light engines, stood still at Redmarshall South signalbox pointing south, both blowing off their safety valves and making a frightening row and clouds of steam. The signals at the Redmarshall North Junction were visible from the Durham Road, and you could race the slow approaching train on your bikes down to Norton Summerville to see it go under the bridge.

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  5. Before the bridge was demolished the walk to the back of Head Wrightson”s s on Yarm Road, without having to brave traffic, was possible. The track had been removed & the bed turned into a linear walkway. I often walked, from home in Coxwold Road, to the ponds behind Heads in search of elderflowers & elderberries, in season, to brew home made wine. Increasing traffic, coupled with the construction of the bridge, rendered the demolition almost inevitable. The more northerly bridge on Oxbridge Lane had been removed some years earlier & in that instance the dip had been infilled to flatten the road.

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  6. The arch looks to me like the top of a larger structure, maybe with a trough below the current ground level. Does anyone know if this is the case and if so is the rest of it buried? Are there any other photographs of it with more exposed than today?

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  7. The small stone drinking trough was put there by Charles Arthur Head (co-founder of Head Wrightson & Co.) who at the time lived at nearby Hartburn Hall.

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  8. The small stone arch as described to the left of picture, was a water trough for horses and I believe earlier had a running spout for drinking purpose.

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  9. Where the photo of this bridge is taken whilst still “Standing” there is a stone arch on the pavement exactly where the photographer is stood taking this photo.Anyone know what it is or why it is there? It is very old and made from bricks not from the bridge(I think). I pass it frequently as I go fishing at the “Bricky” which is to the left of the picture and entrance is now via a “Muddy uphill trek” next to the West end bowling club. Regards

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  10. Hartburn Bridge was a rare example of a “skew arched” bridge. This is so called because the angle of the two road-side supporting walls do not travel at right angles to the parapets. This would be due to the physical contours of the land on either side of the rail track. The skewing would have the effect of allowing the road to take a more easy climb up to the Park area.

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  11. The demolition of Hartburn Bridge was recorded photographically by my father Mr E.W.Thornton. Ogdens undertook the demolition. They first laid a thick bed of earth across the road and collapsed the brick bridge down onto the earth. The cushion of earth prevented any damage to the water and gas pipes that ran under the road. The bridge was demolished as the old railway line that it had once carried had long since been removed. This was the old “Cuckoo Line” – anybody know why it was called that? The waggons taking away the bricks and earth drove away from the site along the track of the old railway line.

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