Sheet music for Jack Marwood and His Maison Band

The cover of a piece of sheet music, which features a picture of Jack Marwood and his Band. Marwood led the band at the Maison de Danse in Yarm Lane Stockton. Information and photograph courtesy of David Thompson

54 thoughts on “Sheet music for Jack Marwood and His Maison Band

  1. I had a great uncle who lived in Norton called Jack Phillips, that would have been in the late 40s he played the violin I think, but there seems to have been a lot of violinists about.

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  2. My Father Reg Dobson played Trombone in Jack Marwood’s Band in the 1950’s he played along side Jackie Patterson Trumpet Player who lived in Darlington we lived in King St Thornaby my Mother and I went along with him To the Maision De Dans on many occasions Good Times Reg Dobson

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  3. On behalf of a resident of Whitby I have been asked to find any information on Harry Walton born 1903 – although he was partially blind he was a scaffolder and well known in the area – he won a dance competition in the early 1930’s at Maison De Danse, Stockton. If anyone has any information I would be very grateful.

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  4. My Dad, Ken Sawers, was a drummer for Jack O’Boyle for a while till he formed his own band under the name Ken Scott.

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  5. I was told that my uncle, George Thompson, played drums for a period in Jack Marwood’s dance band. During war service he had been a drummer in the RAF Central Band, then back in civvy street he started his own printing company in Norton, the Carlton Press.
    Can anyone confirm that he was in Jack Marwood’s band?

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  6. I used to work with a guy called Keith Whittam who played saxophone with the band at one time in the 1950s. I also used to go to the dances on Saturday nights in the late 1950s until the Astoria opened in Middlesbrough. I had great nights at both venues although as it has already been mentioned there was no alcohol inside, you had to get a passout and go to a local pub and it finished at 11.00

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  7. My Grandad Reg Dobson was a Trombone player for Jack Marwood, he lived in King Street, Thornaby and worked as a refrigeration engineer for Trohldal Ltd.

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  8. Hi Bob Irwin (re Dave Usher, drummer.) Middle 60’s, Dave was drummer in a group called the Roadrunners, who I’m sure everyone of that ilk will remember them being a popular favourite at the Jube. Other members of the group were Paul Rodgers (later with Free, Bad Company, etc) Mickie Moody (later Whitesnakes), and a ginger lad called Bruce. I remember them setting off for the “Smoke” to make their mark, with Dave and Bruce returning to Teesside shortly after.

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    • Dave Usher used to live next door to my family in Victoria Avenue. We listened to him practising hour after hour. My Dad was Ron Watson, a great drummer, who played for Jack Marwood before starting his own band.

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  9. I made a single visit to The Maison in either late August or early September 1965 when I was 16. My friend Margaret Briscoe was with me, a friend from secretarial college at Billingham Tech who lived in Eton Road. It was all Beatles and Rolling Stones then, but Jack Marwood and his band played during the evening and I remember all the ‘old’ folks getting up to dance -‘old’ as in my age now! All the young people gathered on the balcony upstairs to watch. It was an interesting clash of two eras – I wonder when the Maison finally closed its doors?

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  10. My grandfather, Billy Dennis played in the Jack Marwood band – my guess is Sax, though he played just about every instrument and was a wonderful musician. He taught in local schools for many years and started the Eston Campus Band before Kelvin took over. He brought music into my life from a very early age, he had me playing all sorts, but my love was piano and he came to every festival I played at as a child. I now sing on the local folk circuit and play and take care of the beautiful piano he left me when he died. He is a real hero of mine and I’d love to find out more about his days in the Jack Marwood Band – he told me so many cool stories from his band days, but I’d love to know more. If anyone remembers Billy, I’d love to hear anything you remember.

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    • Hi There,

      I was a student and a friend of Billy, and knew Kelvin as well. I moved out to America in 1990 and stayed there for 20 years where I played Trumpet and Tenor sax for several bands . I never had the skills or the talent that Billy had but I am still playing trumpet, clarinet and tenor sax in the Midlands. I guess Billy is to blame for all those who still suffer listening to me!

      Seriously though….

      Billy Dennis was the reason I continued to play , having experienced the ex military teacher at West-field’s school in Redcar who took great delight in terrorizing the pupils there. I was ready to quit playing . Fate intervened and Billy took over the role as brass teacher at West-fields and I never looked back. I have always held Billy’s values as a human being very close, he was a cool and a unique person who I miss very much in deed.
      Billy had a marvelous sense of humor and I still laugh at his mannerisms and dare I say it double en tender. I remember getting smashed on cider at the Whitby music festival one year, I think Billy had downed a few as well!

      Whilst living in Iowa I became a member of the Glenn Miller Society and met the Glenn Miller Bands leader Larry O’Brien on two occasions at outdoor concerts in Cedar Rapids Iowa. I also played the trumpet with Emma Kelly in Savannah Georgia (Pirates Bar ) who was a key person in John Berhendt’s book, Midnight in the Garden of Good and evil. She was known as the lady of 10,000 songs and supported Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan in their hay days!

      I probably would never have done this without the enthusiastic encouragement of the great Billy Dennis a man who is a privilege to have known and been friends with. I was ready to quit that morning when Billy walked into West-fields music room, but his personality and upbeat attitude kept me going. I can never thank Billy enough for his help not only as a musician but developing my personality as a human being.

      Billy Dennis a Man in a Million

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      • Hi Kevin!

        I’ve literally just come across your reply and, wow! Thank you so much! This has warmed my heart 🙂 His dry, quick wit was as important as his music. He was always like a film star to me. Dapper and classy, musical genius and super intelligent gent! But his passion to encourage kids to learn music was infectious and admirable, followed by his son, my dad and myself (I work with schoolkids on musical projects).

        Love to you,

        Sara x

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  11. Back in the mid-1960’s Joss Evamy, guitarist and banjo player in the Jack Marwood Band, tried patiently but unsuccessfully to teach me the basics of guitar in the front room of his house in Bedford Street, Newtown. He’d retired by then, (I think), from professional music, and I was just one of a number of aspiring musicians who’d turn up on his doorstep lugging a guitar for a once-a-week session. Together we’d sit at the music stand, me grimly twanging and strumming away while he carried the tune along on the banjo and kept up a one-two-three-four beats to the bar count. It must’ve been teeth-gratingly hell for him at times but he never lost patience, kept his humour and, as far as I know, his sanity. I realise now just how lucky I was to have sat in such illustrious company, even though I didn’t know it at the time, and on those occasions when he must’ve just had enough and let fly on the banjo I caught a glimpse of just how good the feller must’ve been in his prime.

    Wisely, I long-ago abandoned any thoughts of a musical career. It seems you needed to have something called talent.

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  12. Well recalled Julie Povey (Smith) about the Parish Church Hall in Corporation Street. I helped with that group at that period and with the senior part of “Sunday School”.
    We would go on walks in the Cleveland Hills. On one occasion accompanied by my wife to be a teacher at Mill Lane Girls’ School, then Pat Helliwell.

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  13. HARRY ICETON mentioned a dance hall in a street next to Leeds St. Well the street was Corporation Street and the hall belonged to Stockton parish church.( Corporation Hall was in West Row.) I went to a youth club in the parish church hall,in the early fifties, however it had been a dance hall in earlier days,when it was localy known as “the blood tub” my dad told me it was noted for being rough and renowned for fights

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  14. I too lived in Tarring Street and knew Billy Walker. His drum-kit was in the front room of his house. A younger chap called Alan Parkin used to play the piano and their practicing could be heard outside. I dont recall Bill playing at the Maison however he did play in pubs, mainly The Brunswick in Yarm Lane. I loved going to the Maison (my favorite) Brian, I remember the “Fly” song, in fact I sang it to my grandchildren not so long ago. I also remember the song “They’re all after me”. Brian I remember you in the infants school at Mill Lane too.

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  15. I was hoping to be the one to identify Billie Walker as the drummer of “my time”, but others here also remembered him. He was still a student at Richard Hind School as I recall whilst playing with “the band” at The Maison most evenings. Jack Marwood was built along the same lines as Jackie Gleason, swung his baton in a very easy way – as if his band really needed him? What a showman! What was the reason for his frequent departures to the back room? We assumed “to wet his whistle”. I almost forgot, he played the violin once or twice each evening, didn’t he?
    In season there were “private” dances, entrance by pre-purchased ticket only – The Police Ball, The Masterbuilders, all that I recall now. These were long gown and tuxedo affairs, and there was a bar set up at these great social occasions. Great memories of outstanding entertainment, whether it was the weekly hop or the “ball” set to great music.

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  16. I met my husband Jim Lindsay at the Maison in 1944. I was in the NFS and he was at home on leave from REME. I was L/FW Hilary Wright stationed at Headquarters in Oxbridge working as a driver.

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  17. Another Stockton Dance Band was Bert Wallers Band, they played in the Corporation Hall, forgot the name of the Street, it was the next street to Leeds Street, that was in the 1930s and 1940s. He lived in Moat Street at that time and worked in Ashmores Bowesfield Lane as Driller. His son was taught to play the piano and other instruments and went on to play for one of the big bands of that time Ambrose and Evlyn Dall the Vocalist, also playing the piano for famous lady singers in the music Halls aroud the Country.

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  18. Another Stockton Dance Band was Bert Wallers Band. They played in the Corporation Hall, I’ve forgotten the name of the street, it was the next street to Leeds Street,that was in the 1930s and 1940. He lived in Moat Street at that time and worked in Ashmores in Bowesfield Lane as a Driller. His son was taught to play the piano and other instruments and went on to play for one of the big bands of that time Ambrose and Evelyn Dall the Vocalist, also playing the piano for famous lady singers in the music Halls around the country

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  19. Another Stockton dance band that played the Jubilee Hall was Jack Wilson Orchestra. Jack lived in Leeds Street on the same side as the fish shop but further down towards Mill St West.

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  20. Can anyone rememeber the names of any other dance bands who played in Middlesbrough and Stockton in the early sixties.
    I am trying to recall the name of one particular band but they memory is not working. I think they were about an 8 to 10 piece band and the name may have been Sid something but I am not sure. I’m hoping any suggestions might jog my memory.

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    • Jack O Boyle he played at the Palais de Danse in Skinner Street and later Bob Potter and his Band, they were great, Joe Boston played piano and later went on to be the Joe Boston Trio with his brother Colin playing bass, had some great nights there. On Friday nights they sometimes had a famous band playing and on the following morning (Saturday) we had a Jazz club meeting at the Green Bushes Hotel in Yarm Lane and some band members attended at invitation those were the days. Remember Hilda Stevens Band they played at the Carlton Dance Hall in Norton opposite the Moderne Cinema in those days, her daughter Doreen was the vocalist, who went on to sing with Billy Cotton Band (Wakey Wakey) on the BBC Television.

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  21. An article from “Tune Times”, September 1934, a magazine that was to do with the “pop” music of the day, dance band, crooners etc, that I recently came accross:-
    “Jack Marwood and his boys continue to delight the patrons of the Maison De Danse,Stockton. The personnel of the band is as follows:- Jack Marwood violin, leader;Billy Daniels, piano, piano accordian and arranger; Al Liversedge, trumpet; Arn Pardol, drums, vibraphone and xylophone; Jos Evamy, banjo and guitar; Al Robson, alto sax, baritone sax, clarinet and piano; Tommy Heslop, alto sax, violin; Art Dodd, tenor sax, clarinet and deputy leader; Marshall Newton, vocalist and alto sax.
    This outfit is very popular in the Stockton and Middlesborough districts,and in the winter season it is a rare occurence for the boys to one night off from there numerous “gigs”.
    Sadly I dont think there are many left now who danced to the band at this time.

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  22. I met my wife at the Maison in 1943 when the Squadronaires were playing there. Other big bands I remember playing there were Oscar Rabin, Jiver Hutchison, Joe Loss, Ambrose. I also danced with Ruby Renaud at the Maison, she was the best dancer I ever danced with. Im still dancing today at 83 years old.

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  23. Born in 1945 I got the tail end of the great dances at the Maison. I loved going and doing proper dances as well as rock ‘n’ roll and jiving. I remember one particular night buying a raffle ticket, when they called my number out I was too shy and embarrassed to say I had the winning ticket, fortunately that has changed. I lived in Tarring street and remember a very good drummer lived opposite, he was called Bill Walker, does anyone know him and did he play at the Maison at anytime?

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  24. I also met my wife Anne at the Maison, I was in Jockers one night in July 1959 having a pint I was heading home to Aberdeen. I said to the man standing next to me “whats going on next door”, he said it was a dance. I enquired how much to get in, half a crown, so in I went, saw an attractive young girl and asked her for a dance. I was 25, I am now 75 I never went home to Aberdeen, here ever since, married to her, lived in Tarring Street.

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  25. Met my first missus at the Maison while on leave. Wasn’t there also an Oscar-Rabin band??
    Remember a drummer who lived in Tarring Street. Those were the days my friends.

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  26. I was a regular at the Maison in the fifties. The youngsters of today can’t believe that there wasn’t alcohol available there only soft drinks. If you wanted something stronger you got a pass-out & went to the Metropole or Jockers. We thought we were very sophisticated drinking Babycham or Johnny Pine! Also if my memory is correct the last dance was at 10:55. Nowadays the night is just beginning at that time!

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  27. So pleased when my niece showed me the comments regarding Jack Marwood and the Maison. I also danced there regularly (instead of attending Miss Ridley’s shorthand and typing class) from 1942 until I married my husband Alan in 1947. Alan was an airman who was based at Goosepool (Middleton St. George)and I met him at the dance. I remember the base player Joe Muddle who won the accolade base player of the year in a competition in Manchester organised by Melody Maker. I also remember the band playing ‘Tangerine’. Good days, fondly remembered.

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  28. Yes indeed Don great nights. I was a Palais fan, it was the first big Stockton Dance Hall I went to, Christmas and New Year 1944-5 not yet sixteen. To us lads it was a real eye opener. As I had been dancing for a few years, sort of serving my time in the Church halls and school Gym’s, I was never short of partners usually forces girls or married women who’s husbands were away. To me the dance was the main reason for being there unlike most of the lads who went for the girls. Always in as the band struck up you had a clear floor until the interval, it then became a cuddle to music. The Maison was my second choice but once the crowd came out of the pub and stood ten deep at the back spilling onto the dancing area it was impossible to open your legs and move. The Jubilee was much more sedate and we would go there in the festive season as you did get at least some dancing in, the other places were crowded out. Cochran’s dance classes where Ruby taught me Latin, at a price, gave me the edge with the girls who loved the dancing, not too many of the lads could do them. Great times, we all looked forward to the dances as an escape from the mundane, and relaxation after the hours of forced overtime we had to work then. I danced in some wonderful Halls around Britain travelling with the forces including the Streatham Locarno and Hammersmith Palais, but the Palais and Maison whilst on leave seemed like coming home to me.
    They all had big bands, Jack Marwood and Jack O’Boyle were showmen, it all added to the enjoyment, wonderful memories indeed.

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  29. The maison was my favourite haunt from 1942 to the 60s. During the war us local lads had to compete with the Canadian airmen for the favours of the girls. I lost 2 girl friends to canadians, who they married. I remember one of Jack Marwoods party pieces which he sang most saturday nights,
    ” They’re all after me, they’re all after me, they chase me here they chase me there, the devils they chasing me everywhere. Down upon the fish quay shortly after tea there’s haddocks and dabs and ruddy great crabs,they’re all after me.

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  30. My recollections of the band in the mid to late fifties was the sax player, I can’t remember his name, but he was the “school bobbie” if you were off school he would come to your house to make sure you were not playing truant.
    Also Jack Marwood singing his song of “The Little Fly”
    There was a little fly that flew into the sky
    It “PHUT” on the ceiling and it “PHUT” on the floor, it “PHUT” on the bacon and it “PHUT” on the ham and it “Phut” on the head of the little grocery man.
    Now the little grocery man got out his spray gun and said I’ll get that fly before the day is done but before he could count from one to ten the little fly “PHUT” on the grocery man again.

    The “PHUT” was Jack blurting into the microphone.

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  31. The drummer was Ronnie Watson. Lived in Victoria Avenue, Norton. Next door to him lived another drummer called Dave Usher. I hope they practiced at the same time.

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    • Dave practised, and we could hear him through the wall, but Ron, my dad, was out most nights playing so didn’t do much practice at home

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  32. Re the drummer from The Maison, his name was Ronnie (Ron ) can’t remember his second name. When the band disbanded Ron worked as a session drummer in a few of the working mens clubs. He worked in Norton workmens club where I was treasurer. Micheal George, did you live at the back of the buffs club??

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  33. Oh what happy days, this was a frequent haunt of mine round about 1958, I would dance my socks off with my then boyfriend called Brian Hinchcliff who was a fabulous dancer. I can remember winning a prize for the Jive. I think it was a free entry for the Maison and a box of chocolates. I loved watching Jack Marwood and especially the Drummer who’s name escapes me, does anyone remember who he was?

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  34. Re jack Marwoods Band ,Charles Gooding was the Musical Director and Composer of many of the tunes played by Jacks Band He lived in Merrydale Avenue Newtown, He had a disbabled son called Ronnie who me and my mates used to do odd jobs for in his garden at the back of the house and often heard his dad composing tunes on the piano ; Also in the same avenue was a another member of the band called Joss Evamy a nephew of Jacks he could play the Piano , clarinet and the violin . the period I refer to was 1932 to the start of w.w,2. I and Josses brother William [Bill] were good mates at that time but sadly during the war and after we lost touch with them .Some years later early 1950s I had a window cleaning round and used to clean the windows at Jacks house in Newlands Avenue Norton were there was always a cup of tea after the job was done, he was still going strong at that time till about 1968 Jacks Band was the best for many years , Happy days sadly in the past .

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  35. Most happy nights were spent at the Maison de Dance in the company of Jack Marwood and band danced there from around 1947 till I went into the forces 1952 even on leave I made a beeline for the Maison. Those who had the chance to dance to Jacks music and didn”t lost the memory of a lifetime

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  36. This brings back the memories. I danced at the Maison up to 4 nights per week from 1953 till my stint in the RAF in 1956. Great nights an unforgetable part of my life. I remember when I was driving taxis for Tommy Rea, One night picked the band up for transport to Middlesbrough, (where some of them lived) I had to scoot back to Stockton to take Jack & his wife to Norton. I recall the guy who played the clarinet he also played the piano during the break. It was a good time for a dance with plenty of floor to work with as many dancers also took a break at one of the near by pubs ie The Green Tree or the Metropole I wish we could have the days of these great bands back again.

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  37. This has just answered my question re the band that played at the maison! My grandma(age 98)danced here in the 20s and 30s and couldnt recall the name of the band! She always speaks of how charming things were in those days. Smartly dressed folk dancing to a lilting tune of the day and no antisocial behaviour. She and her friend would walk home at two in the morning with no worries at all!!

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  38. I used to go to Maison de Danse in the 1960″s. When Jack Marwood retired in 1968, I think, I read in the Melody Maker that his was the longest residency ever held by a British dance band; he had led the band there from about 1917! I wonder if any of your visitor”s can name any of the people in the band, and their instrument? Give an idea of the date of the picture? Late 20″s perhaps? I know anything about the composer, was he a band member? I don”t know if the piece was published for local consumption or distribution nationwide?

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    • I lived next door to a man who’s father played for Jack Marwood at the Maison. I don’t know his christian, but his surname was TUCK. He played the bass.

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