10 thoughts on “Stockton Bank 1965

  1. Hey Anon. That mobile shop(Bus)was more than likely owned by Jimmy Burdon, Jimmy was an ex RAF fighter pilot, he lived on Roseworth and travelled around the nearby estates(Ragworth, Eastbourne and Primrose Hill)up until the early 80’s, he had a succession of buses and in the end one of the old big yellow British Rail Commer vans. I have fond memories of cold winter nights in the mid to late 70’s waiting at that crossing with mates,(our feet frozen solid in Doc Marten boots) in hope of getting rarely seen engines during the weekend main line diversions, or a named loco pulling the nightly Royal Mail parcel train. Great times!

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  2. Me and mates spent many a winters night in the mid to late 70’s on the Roseworth side of that crossing waiting for Deltics and the likes when the main line diversions ran through Stockton. Great memories! I can still remember the feel of the cold through my red Doc Martens.

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  3. The capuchon on the chimney of 63406 does appear to be missing, one of those detailed differences that used to occur from time to time, leading to variations in an otherwise standard class of locos. By 1965 -the time of the photo – the loco would probably be from a shed north of the Tees, Hartlepool, Sunderland or maybe Tyne Dock. By this time Thornaby”s allocation was all diesel, though steam locos worked into the Tees area until September,1967, when steam in the north east finished. The last Q5s were withdrawn in 1951, but it is possible some old spares eg chimneys were still to be found lurking in odd corners.

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  4. This Q6 appears to have an atypical chimney for this class of engine – the chimney lip looks “odd” – the capuchon (or windjabber) seems to be missing. Could it be a Q5 chimney substitute? I think there were a few Q5″s at Middlesbrough shed…

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  5. Re the bonus turns. The locos were thrashed on these and often showed the signs in the burnt smokebox door. In September 1967, when the last ones were withdrawn from West Hartlepool shed, there was a WD with “Who”s sorry now, The bonus boys?” chalked on the tender. Another sported a chalked BR “double arrow” symbol on its tender. This made no difference; they all went for scrap.

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  6. Well, from your account, the crossing was undoubtedly the one I used to use. It was situated near Rochester road and it enabled me to walk from Freddy Nat school to my home in Ragpath Lane. It was a shortcut. On those occasions when I used to go home via Fuzzy Bridge, I used to walk along a large white concrete pipe situated over a marshy area on the Roseworth side. According to Google Earth, it appears to have gone now and is just a grassy area. That”s where a schoolgirl gave me a bus ticket where its number added up to 21, which in those days was a sign of true love. 🙂 I think her name was Ann Selms. Ah, the memeories !

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  7. The Q 6 loco in the picture is barking up the bank in the usual style, plenty of noise and exhaust. One reason may have been that the north east was probably unique in the country in that enginemen on these local coal and mineral trains were on a bonus system based on work performed. Once they”d finished their day”s ticket they could go home. The result everyone was on their toes and the railway in general benefited from this operationally and the men financially when the bonus was worked out some weeks later. Firemen could be seen giving guards and shunters a hand in marshalling trains and everything was performed at a brisk tempo. The unions were at first lukewarm about the mineral bonus idea on possible safety grounds, but as a fireman friend of mine pointed out. “At the end of the day it”s my neck and money or not I”m not going to take silly risks with it”. Their [the unions] fears proved unfounded and the scheme was evidently very successful.

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  8. To Anon and Merv James, I used to play around here as a kid from 1954 to the early 60″s and never heard of Donkeys Ears, but I can understand where the term came from. To the right just out of picture were the concrete garages off Roswaite Avenue. There were narrow gaps of varying sizes between the garages. Ranging from a foot to two feet. One day the fire brigade had to free a boy who became wedged in the gap. All the kids used to go between the garages, but some were very narrow. Getting back to the crossing, in the field to the right down hill (on the Glebe side) was a marshy area with pools of water, there was a concrete edge which was known as The Harbour. From the crossing back towards Fuzzy Bridge were two more bridges, but these had been filled in with gravel. There used to be a valley and a stream running parallel with the railway, on the Roseworth side, down towards Fuzzy Bridge. This has now been levelled and grassed over, but was a great place to explore for the kids when Roseworth was first built. I have a picture which I will have to dig out, of the concrete encased pipes about eight feet off the ground (now covered over)near Fuzzy Bridge which we used to cycle over. Happy days!

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  9. “Donkey”s Ears” was a nickname given by local kids in the 1950s to the foot crossing towards the top of Rochester Road, Roseworth. It is still there today, leading into Glebe Estate,but previously led over the fields to Norton. The name “donkey”s ears” may have come from the two high flights of concrete steps up and then straight down over the railway fence beside the track, by which the crossing was reached. These steps had two tall vertical hand supports at the top which stuck up prominently and this is one version of the origin of the name. Incidentally, in the photograph there appears to be one of the mobile shops converted from an old bus which used to be a familiar sight on the estates around the time this photo was taken.

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  10. “Donkeys Ears” Foot crossing? Could you clarify where that is/was? The reason I ask is because there was a foot crossing on the line which on the non Roseworth side led to a field and then a path which I used to walk home from Frederick Nattrass school to my house in Ragpath Lane. It was quicker than walking all the way down to the narrow Fuzzy Bridge. Merv

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