18 thoughts on “Class Photograph from Richard Hind School

  1. Responding to my cousin Peter, who moved on to Stockton Sec after School Cert at Richard Hind, it was not unusual for there to be an instability in staffing for French teaching. Some of it arose in the preceding wartime years as younger qualified teachers were called up, often using their language skills in special service.
    When I followed cousin Peter to Richard Hind, but as a member of staff, I soon realised that it was very possible that my excellent Maths/Science colleague GP Dee was a more fluent French speaker than the qualified French teachers!

    Like

  2. Peter, I think we were in 4F at the same time. At Easter 1947 there were 30 in the class and in the School Certificate French exams only 2 passed. We had a lot of French teachers and had a Maths master teaching us French for the last year. If my memory is correct Mr Dee was known as Daddy Dee. He was an excellent Maths teacher. He would occasionally tell us that in his last school there was a motto on the wall which said ‘Get on or get out, there is a third alternative… be flogged’.

    Like

  3. I seem to remember a Peter Wilkinson at Richard Hind who was a good friend of Vivien Wales and Kath Bland. Are you the same Peter?

    Like

  4. To all – especially re Paul/Ken’s comments

    Yes ‘Paddy’ Dee was a great teacher and a great man too. I can still recite the extensions to Pythagoras without any prompting! A great school with great staff also… especially Mr Hale who once made a comment to me that eventually lead me to become a teacher myself after leaving the navy. I was in 4F and managed all 9 School cert subjects except French which I failed miserably! During the war they had to take turns fire watching in the school overnights as well as teach.

    I stayed in the school for the Sept-Dec period after finishing School Cert while I waited to go to the RN so did lots of running about for Mr Rosser carrying messages and working in the little room behind the science lab setting up equipment.

    Like

  5. Does anyone know what happened to John Calder, Ronny Tyreman or Alan Peers? I”m semi-retired (like an old boxer – “I coulda been a contender”)living in Cyprus though I”m often in the UK. from Mr Dee”s left – Stokeld, Tyreman, Kenny Smith, Alan Smith, ?? I think. All the best fellas! Frank

    Like

  6. In my time at RH(1943-47)the second year classes of forty two x two (84) were split up into three classes 3F, 3W and 3T who were classed as the technical class. We cut out the French and did more TD with Eggy Plummer.We did most of the other lessons when we were not dodging the bombs in Denninson Street and slipping down the shelters.A most funny experience with teachers still going off to war till it ended in 1945 and then they started to return like Pop Carling minus a leg which I believe he lost on D-Day and which he enjoyed relating to our class of 3T when we got him going.Like Pauls dad Mr Dee, Pop Carling was a great teacher and always made sure the class enjoyed their lesson.I”ve said it before it was a great school and I enjoyed every minute I spent there.

    Like

  7. In my time at RH (1949-53) when you went into the 3rd year you had a choice of either being in “academic subjects” or “arts and crafts” therefor it was 3F or 3W meaning “F” for French and “W” for woodwork.

    Like

  8. The boy to the left of Mr. Dee is Keith Stokeld and the boy next to him is Ron Tyreman.I”m sat next to Chris Pearson and Fred Starr.According to my old Report Book the class was defined as 5F with 18 boys in the class.

    Like

  9. I made a mistake about the name of the boy on Mr Dee”s left. His name was Tyreman and he was the head boy of 5A. I also think that the boy at the right end of top row is Brian Burns. He came along with Jeff Burns and me, plus the head boy of Richard Hind, Turnbull, to join the 6th Form at Stockton Grammar in Sept 1959. Turnbull may be sitting on Mr Dee”s right. Would it be possible to get a picture of Mr Dee, as we all knew him in the mid fifties? He continued his constitional walks in Ropner Park after he retired from Richard Hind. I met him once in 1969 and he was not very pleased about the fact that I was not a proper scientist. I have also posted some comments elsewhere in “Picture Stockton” about a meeting with Mr Rosser, shortly after he had been told that Richard Hind was to close. A picture of him, too, would be very nice.

    Like

  10. This is the full class of the fifth form 5A. Each year had two forms A(Alpha) and B (Beta) so 5B would have their own photo. Thanks for jogging the memory Fred with a few extra names. All this class are now pensioners or coming up to pensionable age. Happy retirement fellas.

    Like

  11. So nice to hear the my father, Gilbert Dee,was some help in Dr.Fred Starr”s obviously successful career. I am not surprised my father recoiled from experiments with chlorine gas – WW1 affected him profoundly. As it happens I visited Ypres last month and found the grave of Tommy Weatherell killed in the 3rd Battle of Ypres in November 1917. He was my father”s best friend and they volunteered together in 1914. They were in the same RE company and my father was in the burial party. Tommy”s name is on the Stockton Secondary School war memorial.

    Like

  12. The list of boys seems to be correct. I am Fred Starr, second from left in the front row.T he fair haired boy next to me is Georgie Pinder. A tallish boy called Tyson is next to Mr Dee”s left. The boy second from the end is Alec Smith. The boy third from the end on the top row with his head near the open window is Jeff Burns. This is just a proportion of the class, and may represent the science bit. As regards Mr Dee, I owe him a lot. He saw that I had an aptitude for science, and I was not just a clever clogs and show off. He got the other masters to see that there was something more to me. He definitely put in a good word for me with Mr Golding, his opposite numnber at Stockton Grammar when I went on to the 6th Form. One of the great things Mr Dee did was emphasise the need to lay out ones work properly. Nice diagrams in the description of experiments, and putting one”s detailed working out(using log tables)in a separate part of one”s exerise book. This training, in terms of layout, was really helpful to me when I was getting secretaries to type out my work. But like all of us Mr Dee has some blind spots.He seemed to believe that industrial science was quite a low vocation. After a chemical engineer had come round from the ICI to talk about the manufacture of sulphuric acid, to us in a third form class, Mr Dee made it plain that he hoped that we would not be lured into this sort of job. I don”t think Mr Dee really liked the experimental demonstrations, although the only one he definitely objected to was producing chlorine gas. He said with some anguish that this reminded him of the First World War. I believe he said that he was the only member of his sixth form to survive. Despite these views about industrial science, Mr Dee had contacts. He showed us a huge lump of titanium, probably producud by the Kroll process when this technique was still at prototype stage.

    Like

  13. It is true my father(Gilbert Dee) was a Francophile – in fact he was remarkably fluent in French. He never paraded this so it caused some astonishment when the chemistry master conversed easily with the occasional French visitor. During WW1 he was the unofficial interpreter for his company of Royal Engineers. I wish I had followed suit – I am now struggling to relearn French in my retirement. Uphill work indeed.

    Like

  14. When I was at Richard Hind Mr Dee(POP) taught Maths.He was a strict but fair man and my class got on very well with him.This was round about 1943 to 1948.

    Like

  15. Mr. Dee was a remarkable gentleman. On wet mornings when we were allowed to stand in the corridor to avoid the rain, he would walk the full length holding his umbrella in front like a sword and saying “gangway, gangway here”. He was very particular about the pronunciation of the word laboratory, it had to be the English pronunciation, and he began our first chemistry lesson by asking us, “What name do we give to the room in which we are presently seated?” When a boy replied using the American pronunciation he said “No, no, you”re not Boris Karloff boy!”, and made us all repeat it correctly in unison! A great Francophile he always began the chemistry lesson by asking us what we had been learning in our French lessons. He stayed at the school beyond his retirement date, because a replacement for him could not be found. A remarkable gentleman.

    Like

  16. In the photo are Back row. Ian Devereux John Richards ?? Frank Kirtley John Calder ?? Norman Emmerson & Nevill Briscoe Front Row ?? Frederick Starr ?? ?? Pearson Tom Cairney Pa Dee ?? ?? John Kenneth Smith ?? ?? I think Dr. F. Starr is in the front row.

    Like

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s