20 thoughts on “Oxbridge Lane Railway Bridge

  1. My late father Trevor lived in Raby Road (off Oxbridge Lane and formerly known as Haughton Road) in the 1920s, and his recollections of that period (written down in a family history in the 1970s) include the following about farms and farmhouses in the area: ‘In those days Raby Road stood in the midst of farm land, half a mile or more beyond Lustrum Beck which which was the approximate boundary of the residential area to the west of Stockton. In the fields to the south stood Oxbridge Farm, whose lands extended to the outskirts of Hartburn village. To the west was open country as far as the hamlet of Fairfield. To the north were cornfields, soon after converted to pasture and now used as school playing fields. To the east, in the direction of Stockton, the Fairfield road passed through the cornfields of Oxbridge Farm and Grangefield Farm, on the present site of the western Ring Road, as far as the ancient Ox Bridge over Lustrum Beck. Beyond the beck, one mounted West Villas bank, much steeper and narrower than it is now – and thereafter, it is rather less than a mile, via Yarm Lane, to the town centre and the High Street…’ I have never lived in the area, but I recall crossing the railway line close to Grangefield School in the 1950s, sometimes stopping to place a penny (1d rather than 1p!) on the line, to be crushed by one of the many passing steam locos that passed that way. And yes, there was certainly still farmland on the opposite side of the track from the school. My grandparents continued to live in Raby Road until their deaths in 1969-70, but on my last visit to the house in 1968, the railway line was silent and was presumably disused by then.

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  2. I remember this area well, along with the railway bridges and the disused tracks running almost parallel to Whitton Road. As kids we used to play a lot on the disused railway tracks and on the old Grangefield/Ashmores paying fields. Now I’m thinking… wasn’t there an old farmhouse across the fiedds from Grangefield School, not too far from Ashmores?

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  3. I have been reliably informed by an old friend, Keith Fender who lived in Kingsley Road at the time, that the demolition work was carried out in late 1974.

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  4. The answer to the question ‘whereabouts was this?’ was answered in earlier posts. To be clear; It is well up Oxbridge Lane past Oxbridge Avenue and Raby Road. At the end of Oulston Road the road sloped down under the railway.

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  5. Going along this road, the next road on the left would be Waltham Avenue. The bridge that was demolished carried the old ‘cuckoo’ railway line.

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  6. If you got off the bus at Raby Road it was a number 4. Number 5 turned right from Oxbridge Lane & thence up Oxbridge Avenue and up to Newham Grange. At one stage the terminus was at the junction with Grangefled Road, by the cricket ground. Market Day was Wednesday.

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  7. We used to take the bus out to my grandparents house in Raby Road close to this bridge in the 1950s, and it was definitely a number 4 or 5. Not sure where we got on (could have been Stockton or Thornaby station) but we always had a problem getting on when it was Market Day(? Tuesday, Thursday?) as the buses were always full with shoppers returning to their homes. My father, I recall, got particularly annoyed when 2-3 buses came along at one time (as they always seem to do) and none stopped to pick us up!

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  8. As a young girl me and my friends loved a walk up to the cuckoo picking brambles on the side of the railway, we would all lean back against the bank when a steam train was comming, never thought of the danger. The pill box was a great place to play, and you are right Ken, it was used as a toilet, the smell was nasty. The shop you mention was great and we would buy sweets, Edinborough rock was my favourite. The long hot summers as a child seemd to last forever – happy days.

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  9. There was certainly a pill box on the Oxbridge/east side. The Army and the Home Guard practiced there in 1940 and the next year or so. Behind the hedge at the embankment top and behind the pill box was Dixon’s cottage that had a small shop attached. Mr Dixon was a very good gardener. Son Wilf was a very good rugby player and their daughter was a teacher of good repute & respect.
    We lived in Oulston Road backing on to the railway (the cuckoo line!) so the pill box was very near home, depending on the chosen route!

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  10. I remember there used to be WW2 concrete lookout pilbox things, and I think there was one on either side of the bridge. I seem to remember they were often used as toilets as well!!

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  11. To all of those of you with better memories than mine – thanks for the information. When I was in Stockton, for the first time in years, I stood in awe and amazement of the plethora of buses and the new numbering system employed. Out of nostalgia I walked from the town centre to Norton Green – the devastation round Tilery/ Hills was so sad to see.

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  12. Bus routes – I’m sure both numbers 4 & 5 buses went to Fairfield. The 4 via Bishopton Road West to Brookfield Road (opposite Shannon Crescent) and the 5 via Oxbridge & Fairfield Road to Glenfield Road, near the Rimswell pub.

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  13. Alan, The No4 was indeed the Fairfield bus which I believe in later years went via Tithebarn road in Hardwick as part of its route? The No 3 went from the Mile house at Roseworth and terminated at Hartburn village opposite Elmwood. The No 10 was the bus that went to Yarm not sure from where though – memory fading!

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  14. The bus from the High Street in Stockton had to be the number 4 to Fairfield. The No 3 turned off Yarm Lane to Yarm Road at Denshams Corner and terminated in Yarm. Re, the pictures of the bridge: I used to deliver the Evening Gazette for Kirby’s Newsagents in Oxbridge in the first area as you get to the top of the grade into Fairfield. I had to ride the gauntlet with a heavy paper bag under that old railway bridge. I also had to deliver meat for Doug. Staples in Oxbridge after I left Kirby’s. The bike I rode was ordinary for most of it but a small front wheel and a ‘humongous’ (to me at the time) basket over the small wheel made it very difficult to steer and if I was forced to the kerb, and I was many times, I had to stop and push the bike with its heavy load up that hill. Buses were the main culprit as they seemed to enjoy scaring the living daylights out of me.

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  15. I remember getting the bus in 1963, from Stockton, (was it the No 3?) to mmeet up with friends in the Fairfield pub. The weather was Baltic and the driver, even though he was being very cautious, nearly lost it going downslope. The guy coming the other way must have thought his time had come, but manged to pull onto the pavement. The bus driver either by consummate skill or sheer blind luck managed to avoid the bridge abuttments and sailed majestically through. A scary moment!

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