11 thoughts on “Stockton Bottles

  1. I have a 2 gallon flagon with stopper and wooden tap labelled as J.Booth botanical brewer Stockton and darlington, late Booth Brothers, could anyone date it or offer more information on it please, I am aware that Booth Brothers dissolved the business in 1912 after the death of one of the brothers (Harry) but I know very little about the company. any help appreciated

    Like

  2. I have an old green bottle with what looks like a stone screw top with wren stockton written on it can anyone tell me anything about it please?

    Like

  3. The business of H.H.Wren was established in 1871 by Harry (Henry) Horace Wren. The business was a mineral water works, producing such beverages as soda water, lemonade, ginger ale, peppermint and black beer. I haven`t located the exact area of West Row it was situated, but at some point the company took over an adjoining old chapel and converted it to use for the storage and bottling of ale and stout (large stocks of Allsopp`s ale and McKay`s of Edinburgh, stout were kept). The main building of the was three storeys high, measuring ninety feet by thirty feet. There were van sheds and stabling for ten horses. In 1890 the company employed 35 men.

    Like

    • In 1901 the address of H.H.Wren was 19 West Row. I believe this was at the Yarm Lane end of West Row. Perhaps on the opposite side to the Garrick pub. It was close to a place called Kittys Yard. All these buildings have been demolished now. Does anyone recall this area of west Row?

      Like

  4. The Clarence Potteries Company Ltd was established in 1877. They took over the ownership of a pottery, off Norton Road, built by Thomas Harwood in 1847. The company made various types of earthenware products, including Brown (Sunderland) ware. Peak production was in the 1890`s when they employed 40 workers, mainly female. The business closed in 1927.

    Like

  5. P.Bruce & Sons took over the business of Jeremiah Booth,botanical brewer,at some date between 1914 and 1930. Botanical brewing was a fermentation process using herbs and plant roots. The resulting products,such as ginger beer,dandelion & burdock and lemonade,were meant to be low in alcohol and as such suitable for teetotallers and young people. Fentimans still carry on the tradition today. Large stone bottles like this were often delivered door to door by companies and collected when empty. In 1930 No.96 High Street was shared by a number of businesses, including the Home & Colonial Stores Ltd, grocers and the Singer Sewing Machine Company. 96 High Street was next to the Victoria Inn.

    Like

    • My husband is the great grandson of Peter Bruce. His father, Jack, was the last of the family to run the business. He would love to have this bottle…he has nothing pertaining to the business

      Like

      • I have one your husband could have, just started bottle collecting and found one. I live in Yarm – contact Picture Stockton and they will pass on my mobile number.

        Like

  6. The stone bottle in the top left is from P.Bruce & Sons,botanic beer brewers,who had a business at 96 High street in 1930.The stone bottle in the top right is from The Clarence Potteries Ltd,who were situated on Grove Terrace in 1930.The picture on the far right shows the stamp mark that is impressed into the bottle.The green glass bottle is from H.H.Wren & Co.who had a business in West Row.

    Like

    • Martin – is the Wren company on the glass bottle the same Wrens who had a factory on the Durham side of the river at Yarm bridge?

      Like

      • In 1883 Harry Horace Wren was carrying on a business at West Row,Stockton as a soda water manufacturer. At this time he was also in business with Edmund Cecil Wren and Charles Herbert Wren as millers,corn and flour merchants,under the name of Wren Brothers. I know there was a vinegar brewery(there is a photo somewhere on this site of it)near to Yarm bridge, but I can`t confirm if any of these gentleman are in any way linked to it. Hope this has been of some help Cliff.

        Like

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s