William Newton School/Education Centre, Junction Road

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Views of the Education Centre formally William Newton School on Junction Road, Norton prior to demolition.

Photographs and details courtesy of Terry Westwood.

5 thoughts on “William Newton School/Education Centre, Junction Road

  1. I worked at The Education Centre for over 7 years. It was a lovely building to work in. The quadrangle was lovely in the summer, with the pond and the wildlife. It was a shame it had to go. It was always busy with people coming in for courses, Adult education classes and educational training for schools. It would of of been ideal to turn it back into a school again, but no doubt it would have been too expensive.

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  2. I attended William Newton from 1952 – 1955. Always had fond memories of the school, especially Miss Thompson who taught English. She was a lovely lady who lived in Norton High street. Also Mrs Wardell the art teacher. I still have a painting that she did in my autograph book.

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  3. This school was a large part of my early life. My Father delivered material when it was being built with me a young nipper in the cab. The first Headmaster was to be Mr Edwards who lived in the largest newly built house in Rosebury Road at the top end of Bradbury Road, I played with his son Bruce same age and his Daughter Ruth older. The 2nd Norton Scouts had their Scout Shows there and the hall would be packed. The A Company 8th Bt Cadets met there and most weekends we did infantry training on the field. My early dancing years were in the hall Cadets Scouts Guides and other youth groups held dancers to live music mainly almost weekly, that of course led to my early holding hands courting days. We all knew each other as Norton was a solid community then, Parents had grown up with each other and it continued with us the next generation.
    The years passed my children did courses there, my wife and I did extra mural courses and on a couple of occasions danced there once again at social events. When I retired I took three years of cookery with Janet cookery teacher using me as a sous chef, we were all retired gents and we spent more time rushing round taking milk pans off stoves and setting ovens, I did not envy the cleaners after we finished.
    Now it ends, I saw William Newton built and soon will see it demolished, an integral part of my life been then gone with all the happy memories held within its walls. My late wife saw St Peter and Pauls school come and go she worked there for 20 years, she would be very sad to see the end of this wonderful in its time school as well. For once I am with those posters on here who would like to keep the old buildings, surely a use could have been found for it.

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    • Yes, sorry if it goes. How about a community centre, business units or a retirement home? I attended it during the 50’s and remember the words of our geography teacher. You can tell the rainfall of a building by looking at the slope of the roof…Steep roofs, heavy rain – flat roofs, lack of rain… It’s true, so why did the fashion of flat roofs catch on about then and later, in the 60’s? They look AWFUL, like boxes – yuk! I always remember the words of that teacher when I see a crumbling 60’s building!

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