Stockton High Street, c1895

t14850This Victorian photograph of the northern end of the High Street seems to have been taken from about the end of Wellington Street but in the middle of the High Street. To the left is a parade of shops with sun blinds extended, this is where you will now find Robinsons/Debenhams and The Globe Theatre. Robinsons was built in 1901 and the Globe in the mid 1930s, just past the shops but set back out of sight will be the North Eastern public house, which of course is still there, Bishopton Lane heads off to the left at the building that I have always known as Maxwells Corner, straight ahead is of course Norton Road which in later years housed such businesses as Chapmans Garage, Dickens Hardware and Cowies with their excellent motor cycle section in the basement. Off to the right is Church Road and St. Mary’s Church as well as the small set back section of road that stands in front of the Royal Oak, to the very right is a building which was replaced by a 1960s edifice which in turn has since disappeared, some of the buildings now long gone could possibly date back to the 1700 hundreds.

Photograph and details courtesy of Bruce Coleman.

12 thoughts on “Stockton High Street, c1895

  1. The high building in the background centre is the North Terrace Wesleyan Church, which was there long before Cowies on the corner of Hume Street.

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  2. Love this picture. The Church is St Thomas’s Parish Church. St Mary’s is the Roman Catholic Church in Norton Road and out of sight in this picture.
    One should also remember that not all the buildings in the High Street were shops. Opposite St Thomas Church, at the time of the photograph were the residence of the Vicar, Rev Martin, of the Church and the former residence of George Young Blair owner of Blair & Co. Marine Engine Factory on Norton Road.

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  3. Nice picture Bruce and good description of the old Town, parts not quite as old as you would think.
    The Alms Houses were built in 1850’s then demolished for the buildings on Knowle Street to the Church. The Building demolished to build Lindsay House also now gone was Victoria Buildings a lovely facade with shops under it I remember a shoe shop Timpson’s? a typewriter shop and was it one of the first cleaners Zip? The high Street was still cobbled throughout my school years and the time I worked in the Town, many of the old lamp posts and tram cable posts still there though for safety’s sake had to go.
    Massive changes in my time the grandchildren love it others may hate it, to me a huge improvement with a clean up that was needed though the new brush swept things away that would still enhance the town today, pity but that is progress for you.

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    • There was a branch of Timpson shoes in the Victoria Buildings in the early 1960s.
      The main branch was in Dovecote Street and Timpsons wanted to rebuild that branch opened up a sub branch across the High Street in the Victoria Buildings. That branch catered for ladies and children and they opened another shop next to the Odeon cinema for the men. However, the jewellers on the corner of Dovecote Street and the High Street objected because the demolition of Timpsons would have exposed the wall that backed onto their safe thus making it vulnerable.
      The shop was never demolished and eventually they two sub branches closed.

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  4. I’ve been away awhile – have they renamed St Thomas’s Parish church “St Mary’s”? My maiden name is Thomas. When I was little I thought the church somehow belonged to us as all my older siblings were in the choir.

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    • Susan, when it was consecrated on August 12th 1712 it was the Parish Church not named after a Saint. People still called it ST Thomas Chapel of ease after the original built in 1235. I always knew it as the parish church when attending from school, as Scouts then Army Cadets.
      To me it is Stockton Parish Church and I am too old to change.

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    • Surely this photo was taken, looking north, from, or near to, the Town Hall? If it was taken from Wellington Street, looking towards Maxwell’s Corner, we wouldn’t be able to see Victoria Buildings or most of the shops on the left of the shot either.

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