17 thoughts on “Blandford’s Corner, Norton

  1. All the comments show one thing, the vast difference in how we managed our ills, and how far medicine has come from 60-70 years ago. Things that can be cured now were killers back then, Osteomyelitis was an unknown as to what the cause was, we now know it was a bone disease easily cured today with antibiotics, back then you got your leg in my case and in most cases I knew of apart from one who had it in the hip well and truly plastered. I was in bed in hospital and Doctor Reed the bone specialist came to see all of us every day. They could not keep some of us in bed, Ropner ward had a piano, the Matron was Irish and I could because of family connections play all the old Irish airs, guess who was Matrons favourite?
    When they found a couple of us lads climbing the ivy on the wall at the end of the ward to see the girls in the ward upstairs they decided to uncage us. Mr Reed told us straight, exercise, take Glucose D on all our food and in tea and he would see us all once a month to monitor progress. No antibiotics then in fact that was the only medication G/D as I called it, you got used to the taste in time. A bit of bullying at school when I went back but with a pair of crutches a big iron on my plaster they discovered I had an arsenal of deadly weapons and left me alone.
    I had reason to go into Stockton and Thornaby Hospital as it was about to close and Doctor Reed was still there, I blessed him, he put me right not every one was as lucky.
    Doctor Moony told my Mother about some of his time as a POW in the far east, I think after what he had seen our ills were small although he was thorough in his examinations.
    Doctor Armatage took a couple of moles off my knee, she put vaseline round the mole then used acid dripped on it, two days later they dropped off.
    I think our expectations of what Doctors could do was in line with what was available as medication, I lost three lovely friends to things that could be cured today. Rickets were rife in the poorer areas, the normal Childrens diseases could kill and there are plenty of people who remember Iron Lungs some children spent months in. Today expectations are too high Doctors do their best with what they are allowed to work with and that usually comes down to money.
    My experience of the NHS is of a wonderful system, but over worked understaffed personal can only do their best as did our old time Doctors, bless them all. Having reached my 88th year with their help I do.
    Frank.

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  2. Opposite side of the road Ian, Armitage Place, the Doctors surgery as it once was. Doctor Blandford was a well known Doctor before my time, as the 0 bus drew in to the stop the Conductor would shout Blandfords Corner.
    That is indeed the Highland Lad Pub, the houses in time became shops then some of them later knocked down though not all, you can still see the outlines of the corner which became a Cobblers.
    My Doctor was Wilmot who had been in the army and was always good if you wanted a few more days leave from the army, we would talk about the Middle east then he would say bad back is it have a few days at home. Doctor Armitage was the Lady Doctor who did not take prisoners you got no extra leave off her. I then had Doctor Moony a lovely man who operated on me in his surgery taking some fatty lumps off my head. local anesthetic a few quick cuts then sixteen stitches and back to work. Things were done very differently then and probably for the better.
    The High Street has seen many changes in my lifetime though it always seems to keep its main character.
    Frank.

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    • Doc Armitage was our doctor also, and as you say, was very strict. Having read your explanation, it all came flooding back. Many thanks, Frank.

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    • I remember Drs. Mooney, Wilmott and Armitage. Dr. Armitage was strict as you say Frank, as was Dr. Mooney whereas Dr. Wilmott was a more laid back character. I remember when Dr. Mooney was our doctor I was waiting outside his room and in that time Dr. Wilmott saw about five patients before I was called in to see Dr. Mooney who always was thorough.
      Do you also remember the antiquated system of being summoned from the waiting room to the doctor’s surgery? You collected a disc which was coloured and had a number on it, then you waited until your doctor’s name flashed up and everyone then began asking who had the lowest i.e. next number!

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      • Our doctor was Dr Wilmott. I now live in Devon but we were up in Teesside the other day visiting places from my happy childhood days. I was telling my husband about the system with the coloured discs. Strange how some things stay in your mind after so many years. Happy days.

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        • I remember similar discs being used in the surgery at the end of Mansfield Avenue in Thornaby. What is more memorable and unimaginable nowadays, was the sight of the doctor sitting at his desk, puffing away on either a cigarette or a pipe.

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        • Doctor Wilmot lived in a large house on Norton Green until he retired, he then went to the Lake District I believe. He once asked me how I ever got in the army having had Osteomyelitis one of the few cured of quite a lot of local children who got it. I told him that at the recruitment centre in Middlesbrough it was him who passed me A1+. I had spent several months in plaster between twelve and thirteen with a leg iron, the Surgeon at Stockton and Thornaby Hospital told me if I did what he told me I would get my wish and join up, needless to say I did do that. It included walking miles playing all the games as I normally would and never giving up when the pain was blinding me.
          Doctor Wilmot had been in the Middle East as I had and we would sit talking about it often laughing at the way things were out there. I am sure he missed the life, the forces are different and something you either love or hate.
          Doctor Moony I was told had been a POW of the Japanese, he really cared about his patients. He was a hands on Doctor and as well as removing the lumps on my head he took a steel splinter from my eye, no referring you elsewhere as would happen now straight in and done. A different breed at a different time we all miss them.
          Frank.

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          • I have two friends who had osteomyelitis & went onto to play professional football one at Middlesbrough & the other at Hartlepool, they both had a calliper on their leg.

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          • Frank before leaving to go to the Lakes he moved from the Green to a small cottage in Ragworth Place. I often wondered if he and his wife moved in with his daughter prior to going to the Lakes. My sister who spent a lot of time in the Lakes often visited him at his home there.

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          • Yes Frank I seem to remember the story that Dr. Mooney had been a P.O.W. although I didn’t know he was in the Far East.
            I also seem to remember seeing Dr. Wilmott for the removal of a wart on my thumb. I can see it now, he placed his cigarette in the ashtray sprayed my thumb with some substance to numb it, pulled off the offending wart, bandaged it and returned to his still lit cigarette!
            Those were the days, no, “Oh you’ll have to go to A & E”.

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        • Remember the meshed area to the right of the disc board where they made up your medicines. I remember going in that room when I was very very young for a jab.

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  3. Pardon my ignorance yet again, but where exactly was (or is) Blandford’s Corner. In the backgound is what appears to be the Highland Laddie pub, but I’m probably wrong. Over to you, folks.

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    • I agree about the Highland Lad, so that makes it where (in my day – I left Teesside in 1973) taken from Harlands Shoe Shop, with what was Walter Wilsons next door. A lovely photo nevertheless.

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