North Street, Stockton c2017

When I saw the recent post of North Street c1980’s I recognised the buildings straight away as I often use the Wellington Street car park which strangely enough has North Street to it’s north! So, some thirty years later on the 1 July 2017 I went along and found that one of the featured buildings is now a gents hair stylist, barbers as was, whilst the rest of the row is easily recognisable although some of the window positions have altered and their frames are now made from upvc rather than wood. It’s nice to see that the original street nameplate is still in position and made from stone unlike the later enamel or cast metal ones or even the pressed steel or plastic ones of today . Interesting too is the width of the houses, I’m assuming that North Street and Bishopton Lane were built back-to back with the only access through a front door?

Photograph and details courtesy of David Thompson.

Yarm Rooftops, April 2017

These sets of pictures were taken from the window of a Grand Central train which runs from Sunderland, through to Kings Cross, via Northallerton. It picks up passengers at Eaglescliffe and Hartlepool but for some reason does not stop at Stockton. Is the platform too short?

The Yarm rooftops show how much new building has gone on behind Yarm High Street. I was surprised to learn this morning that Teesside, unlike other conurbations does not have a formal Greenbelt, protecting the surrounding countryside.

Photographs and details courtesy of Fred Starr.

William Sharps Warehouse, New Street in Thornaby

William Sharp was a well known market trader with a towed caravan/stall placed adjacent to The Shambles on Stockton High Street. Mr Sharp sold fish, eggs and poultry and was famous for his boiled crabs and winkles at 6p a bag with a free pin provided. The eggs he sold were excellent value and his number one seller.

I worked for Mr Sharp (Bill) for four years, and always admired him and his wonderful family and son David. They rose at 5am each day, and took up their positions on the four markets they attended by 7am each day, getting back home at 6pm. This was fine in the summer, but an hardship in the winter when it was bitterly cold, snowed or rained. Suffice to say he never took an holiday, was never ill, and was always well admired by all who knew him. A fine man whom I still miss and admire.

Photograph and details courtesy of Bob Wilson.